Category Archives: Diesel-hydraulics

Sunshine after the rain

D1057-TAUNTON-160775

They said there’ll be snow at Christmas

They said there’ll be peace on Earth

But instead it just kept on raining

A veil of tears for the Virgin birth

There’s not much connection between this time of year and the pic above, other than the seemingly incessant rain that blights so many otherwise promising days in this lovely country of ours.  Although taken in summer (July 1975, Taunton), it’s arguably more typical of December than the archetypal snow scene.

Anyway, it’s one of my favourite shots of one of my favourite locos, with some lyrics from my favourite Christmas song;  I hope it serves as an appropriate greeting to all those who have read, commented on or otherwise supported ‘Windcutter’ in the past year, with my best wishes for the New Year.

Photo copyright of myself (as it’s my shot), and of John Turner of 53A Models, who has worked wonders lately in turning some of my variable transparencies into decent images.  See more by following the ’53A’ photostream link in the sidebar.


			

7 Comments

Filed under Diesel-hydraulics, Heritage diesels

Modern Locomotives Illustrated

Issue 197 of this periodical has now been out a short while, and deals with the North British type 2s, both diesel-electric and diesel-hydraulic, of what became classes 21, 22 and 29.  The editor says that this one has been by far the most difficult to put together, and wearing the less charitable hat that I’m known to don on occasion, I’d probably say that’s because it hasn’t been possible to rely on the padding of privatisation or preservation era material….  But cynicism aside, whilst this is a publication I’ve been known to criticise, I have to balance that by saying that this issue really is a cracker, and well reflects the effort that must have gone into it.

The diesel-hydraulic content seems stronger, but that’s not to say that that of the diesel-electrics isn’t worthwhile.  The shots that I’ve seen before do generally fall into the category of ones that I’m happy to see again (some of these being Jim Binnie’s, from his erstwhile Fotopic Diesel Image Gallery),  and there are some new GNoS area images.   The selection of class 29 rebuilds seems to include class members that are less commonly photographed, and the freight formation behind 6124 at Eastfield is characteristically fascinating.  The WR selection includes some very interesting or unusual locations and workings; Cheddar Valley, S&D demolition, Torrington, the Callington branch and the Paddington – Bude summer service seen at Halwill Junction.

Much of the text, too, makes pleasant reading.  In the uncredited introduction on Order and Design, the myth of unreliability, particularly of the diesel-hydraulic 22s, is addressed.  It’s become far too fashionable for commentators to ascribe the demise of much of BR’s Modernisation Plan fleet as due to unreliability or (that other hackneyed phrase) being ‘non-standard’.  Whilst it’s unarguable that some poor decisions and purchases were made, it’s also the case that too many locos were ordered at a time when rail traffic and trackage were being decimated; that being the case, it’s only natural that the larger or stronger classes would fare better once steam had been eliminated and surpluses identified.  Had it been the case, however, that the work had been there for the other classes, then effort would have been put into making them fit for service.  One thing that I didn’t expect to see addressed though (because it rarely is), is the generally better reputation of the 21s allocated to Kittybrewster for the GNoS section – whilst these are usually tarred with the same brush as the Eastfield contingent, it’s rare to see a photo of one in anything less than immaculate condition and anecdotal comment suggests they were looked after mechanically and performed accordingly.

All in all though, a good buy at less than a fiver and even if you only favour one class over the other, the coverage of each is good enough that you shouldn’t be disappointed.

More information on the series can be found at http://www.mli-magazine.com/index.html

1 Comment

Filed under Diesel-hydraulics, Heritage diesels, Scottish railways